About Us

The Southern New England Simmental Association (SNESA) was formed in 2011 to promote Simmental and Simmental-cross cattle in the region.  SNESA is a regional affiliate of the American Simmental Association, and is designed to serve Simmental breeders in southern New England with the promotion, improvement and marketing of their cattle. The benefits of membership in this organization provide the producer with educational programming, networking options and marketing opportunities to help its' adult and junior members purchase and sell cattle.  These events include a SNESA Cattleman’s Conference, an annual production sale, and monthly meetings. Also, SNESA will be participating in several cattle events throughout the region, such as the Big East, Eastern States Exposition, and the Northeast Livestock Exposition.  We extend to you an invitation to come  and see what we are all about! 

Next Meeting

Saturday, February 2, 2019
3pm

Anna & Mike's House
16 Concord Rd
Southwick, MA 01077

Potluck - bring your favorite dish

Why Simmentals?

Variability is a lesson that could be well taught by the Simmental. An ancient breed, the ability to adapt to its environment has allowed them to become influential in cattle markets across the world. Simmentals were developed at a time that cattle were multipurpose creatures, not only were they raised for their meat but also for their heavy milking ability and even draft uses. The fact that they were so extensively used made it necessary to highlight docility amongst planned crosses. Most of these traits, some now enhanced, continue in the modern Simmental. 

The Simmental traces its origins to the Simme Valley in Switzerland. Impressive in size, Simmentals had an early worldwide distribution, some areas having more success in their production than others. Simmentals are known by distinct names, all having regional breeding focuses. The Pie Rouge of France has an emphasis placed on beef production; their cattle are thick with heavier musculature. The Montbeliarde was bred to continue the heavy milking potential of the Simmentals. Many consider these to be the second heaviest milking strain, surpassed only by the Holstein. The Abondance is more moderate in size; it has a smaller frame and relative to the other varieties, is lighter boned. The popular Austro-German Fleckviehs have superior fleshing abilities and are easy calvers. The Swiss Simmentals continue to be large framed with generously proportioned muscles. The Italian countryside has seen its own Simmentals, referred to as Peseta Rosa—which translated means rose-colored coins, a likely tribute to the marketability of the Simmental. 

Simmentals were introduced very early into the United States. Their earliest recorded presence was in Illinois during 1887. A transitional time in the country, the Simmental had little success until its reintroduction in the 1960s. The first purebred calf was born in 1968, out of a breeding using imported semen. In 1974, the World Simmental Federation was formed. Its main goals were to unify breeders by providing a base for information and research exchange, and to increase the influence and importance of the breed. The American Simmental Association came together in order to further the advancement of the breed within the United States. Its members though diverse in their backgrounds coincided in their progressive approach. The ASA has open AI breedings, a cow recognition program and within herd comparisons. It was the first breed association with a sire summary. Performance data for the Simmental has also translated directly in the show ring. 

Though unmistakable similarities exist within Simmentals of every region, the American Simmental has focused primarily to highlight the breed's beef qualities. They are rugged animals of substantial bone. Ultimately large in size, it may come as a surprise that Simmentals are exceptionally easy calvers. Though they have low birth weights, they have fast growth rates. Cows are excellent mothers and have very long production cycles. Cows and bulls reach sexual maturity early, in contrast to other Continental breeds that may take longer to develop. Though their milking abilities have not been selected for, the Simmental continues to be an above average milker. Their economic benefits to beef breeders are almost unsurpassed by any other breed. They are of renowned docility, and have excellent weight gaining abilities. 

The carcass yield is very good, with meat grading high. Simmental beef is tender and highly palatable. The upgrading program in America has introduced a wide range of colors to the breed. The original coloration for Simmentals was red and white or gold and white. All colors and all color patterns are accepted within the American Simmental Association. A gene for polledness has also been established within the breed, most likely coming from Angus crosses. 

There is so much variety within the breed that ranchers may select those animals better suited to their particular environments. They are such an adaptable breed however, that a universal standard is difficult to quantify. The risk of a lessened genetic pool is minimal for Simmental breeders. A very popular cross is the SimAngus; the resulting offspring combine the best of the English and Continental breed traits. Performance numbers, fertility rates, yield grades and marbling have made these cattle highly marketable. 

The Simbrah, a cross between Simmental and Brahman is also flourishing in regions that cannot support extensive grazing. The Brahman influence in the cattle makes them hardy and more resistant to the climate and flora of southern regions in the US. Simmental cattle are a wealth amongst beef breeds. Their traits are exceedingly heritable and the data for prediction of offspring qualities is very reliable. The naturally lean beef, its tenderness and high yield is an asset for feedlots. 

As more breeds continue the search for heterosis, the Simmental is likely to be a superb complimentarity option. It is their docility and variability which will keep the Simmental a powerful presence amongst the beef industry. 

The beautiful Simme Valley in Switzerland where the Simmental breed originated.

The beautiful Simme Valley in Switzerland where the Simmental breed originated.

Officers/Members

2018/2019 Officers

PRESIDENT
Ron Dziembowski 
Double RD Farm
400 River Rd
Hillsborough, NJ 08844
(508) 868-8836
(774) 289-4564
rluvsangus@aol.com


VICE PRESIDENT
Ann Demko
Pine Brook Acres
P.O. Box 14
16 Concord Rd
Southwick, MA 01077
(413) 627-4282
pinebrook0@aol.com


SECRETARY
Jodie Dias
Dias & Daughters Farm
11 Lincoln St
Norton, MA 02766
(508) 285-8782
jmdias1015@hotmail.com


TREASURER
Rhonda Dziembowski 
Double RD Farm
400 River Rd
Hillsborough, NJ 08844
(508) 868-8836
(774) 289-4564
rluvsangus@aol.com

2017-2018 Junior Officers

PRESIDENT
McKenzie McLarnon
123 Ramshorn Road
Charlton, MA 01507
(508) 248-3208
luvnormandy@aol.com


VICE PRESIDENT
Lily Dias
11 Lincoln St
Norton, MA 02766
(508) 285-8782
lmd040903@hotmail.com


SECRETARY
Caitlyn Chernicki
680 Liberty St
Hanson, MA 02341
(339) 933 5373
caitlynchernicki@yahoo.com


CO-TREASURERS
Emma Dias
11 Lincoln Street
Norton, MA 02766
(508) 285-8782
jmdias1015@hotmail.com

Haley-Ann Lynch
P.O. Box 14
Southwick, MA 01077
(413) 627-4282
pinebrook0@aol.com


Members

Harvey E. Baskin
342 Ranch House Lane
Richmond, TX 77469
(860) 450-6841
Harv_Bask@att.net

Scott & Melanie Brundage
217 Maple St.
Douglas, MA 01516
(508) 476-3923
scottbrundage@msn.com


Michael Chernicki
Necka Farm
680 Liberty St
Hanson, MA 02341
(339) 933 5373
cailey6807@msn.com

Mike & Anna Demko
PineBrook Acres
P.O. Box 14
16 Concord Rd
Southwick, MA 01077
(413) 627-4282
pinebrook0@aol.com


Jodie & Al Dias
Dias & Daughters Farm
11 Lincoln St
Norton, MA 02766
(508)285-8782
jmdias1015@hotmail.com


Ron & Rhonda Dziembowski  
Double RD Farm   
400 River Rd
Hillsborough, NJ 08844
(508) 868-8836/(774) 289-4564
rluvsangus@aol.com
 

Jonathan Eddy
New Boston Beef LLC
9 Fabyan-Woodstock Road
North Grosvenordale, CT 06255
(860) 315-2408
newbostonbeefsales@gmail.com
www.newbostonbeef.com

David, Suzanne, & Amber Green
38 Woodbury Hill Road
Jaffrey, NH 03452
(508) 846-0706
suzannegreen100@gmail.com
davidgreenjr100@gmail.com

Michelle Hipsky
Hipsky Farms
136 Turnpike Road
Willington, CT 06279
(860) 377-5842/(860) 684-5593
harold_hipsky@msn.com


Elena & Jeremy Lynch
Lynch Farms, LLC
32 Pineywood Rd
Southwick, MA  01077
classictshirts@comcast.net
(413) 221-6279

Paul and Sharon Murphy
Ledge Knoll Farm
13 Niles Road
Eagle Bridge, NY 12057
(518) 686-7280/(518) 686-4180
smurphypcs@yahoo.com

Junior Members

Jean Pierre Allard
35 Daniel Beard Rd592
Pittsburg, NH  03592
(603) 331-1840
tabint@hotmail.com

Abigail Bennett
633 County Rd
Woodstock, CT  06287
(860) 382-02591

Victoria Briggs
469 South Road
Sullivan, NH 03445
(603) 370-1877
brcc@myfairpoint.net


Caitlyn Chernicki
680 Liberty St
Hanson, MA 02341
(339) 933 5373
caitlynchernicki@yahoo.com


Bill Costantine
Hartfeld Farm
157 Northwest Rd
Spencer, MA 01562
(774) 633-4414
sunsetfarms@charter.net


Clayton Costantine
Hartfeld Farm
157 Northwest Rd
Spencer, MA 01562
(774) 633-4414
sunsetfarms@charter.net


Emma Dias
11 Lincoln Street
Norton, MA 02766
(508) 285-8782
jmdias1015@hotmail.com


Lily Dias
11 Lincoln Street
Norton, MA 02766
(508) 285-8782
lmd040903@hotmail.com


Dalton Gromlich
12 Schappel Rd
Hamburg, PA 19526
DJgromlich@gmail.com


Ben Hipsky
136 Turnpike Rd
Willington, CT 06279
(860) 684-5593
harold_hipsky@msn.com


Haley-Ann Lynch
P.O. Box 14
Southwick, MA 01077
(413) 627-4282
pinebrook0@aol.com


Riley Lynch
P.O. Box 14
Southwick, MA 01077
(413) 627-4282
pinebrook0@aol.com


McKenzie McLarnon
Little Bit of Luck Farm
123 Ramshorn Road
Charlton, MA 01507
(508) 248-3208/(774) 200-9882
mckenzie_anne@aol.com
luvnormandy@aol.com